Anthropology

Published on December 24th, 2013 | by admin

Anthropomorphism: are we guilty?

Julie Hecht, MSc is a researcher and science writer fascinated not just by animal behaviour and welfare, but how we think about animals and the consequences of those thoughts. Take anthropomorphism (attributing human characteristics to animals or objects) as a key example. In this episode of Human Animal Science we explore what actually happens when we think that dog is guilty; or that cat is grumpy. We discuss why we anthropomorphise and how it impacts on the animals.

Listen to this podcast:


Links:
Dog Spieswww.dogspies.com  |  Dog Spies Blog on Scientific American

Horowitz Dog Cognition Lab (Barnard College, Columbia University, New York)www.dogcognition.com

The Bark magazine

Do You Believe in Dog? Blog

 

Publications:

Hecht, Miklosi, & Gacsi (2012) Behavioral assessment and owner perceptions of behaviors associated with guilt in dogs. Applied Animal Behaviour Science, 139. 134-142.

Do dogs feel guilty? Jason Goldman | Scientific American

Hecht & Horowitz (2012) Physical prompts to anthropomorphism of the domestic dog (Canis familiaris) Third Canine Science Forum, Barcelona, Spain. Journal of Veterinary Behavior: Clinical Applications and Research, 8, e30.

Horowitz (2009) Disambiguating the “guilty look”: Salient prompts to a familiar dog behavior. Behavioural Processes, 81, 447-452.

Horowitz (2007) Naturalizing anthropomorphism: Behavioral prompts to our humanizing of animals. Anthrozoös, 20, 23-35.

 

Image credit: Flickr/Brainware3000




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